Porn for Women

porn for women

Cindy Gallop, an extravagant New Yorker/advertising consultant, dates younger men, preferably those who are still in their early twenties. This preference is something she’s very open about. Not only is she open about her inclinations, she’s open about her sex life, which is something that caused quite a stir at TED2009 in Long Beach, California when she stepped out on stage and said, “When I date younger men, I have sex with younger men. And when I have sex with younger men I encounter very directly and personally the real ramifications of the creeping ubiquity of hardcore pornography in our culture.”

She’s right. There is a huge disconnect between what women want in bed and what is currently being produced in pornography. When we watch a woman being drilled by a man who’s bending her into some risqué Cirque du Soleil position to the point of shrill orgasmic ecstasy, it becomes ingrained in our brains that these are the things we need to do in bed to please our partner, which is not always so. It’s okay to watch pornography with a far-fetched storyline; it’s just that what’s being portrayed on-screen is not what most women want, which is something, it seems, men of a certain age are finding difficult to differentiate.

“At the moment, 99.9 percent of all mainstream mass-market porn is made by men for men,” Gallop explained. I contacted her to ask if she thought it was a good idea for boyfriends to bring porn into the bedroom after a particularly distraught reader wrote in about his botched attempt to watch Let’s Play Anal Twister with his girlfriend. “I have to explain to guys that women like sex and porn, too. But when we get ourselves off, we have to watch the porn that’s made for guys…it’s entirely male-centric in its worldview and it doesn’t take into account at all women’s needs, wants and desires.”

Despite pornography being mass-produced almost immediately after the invention of the camera, it wasn’t until the 1970s that most companies even toyed with the idea of creating porn for the female demographic.

While the erotica industry kept the visually explicit material strictly for the boys, women were climbing the ranks of new media, which eventually led to the 1972 April edition ofCosmopolitan, which contained the now-infamous nude shot of Burt Reynolds on a fur rug as a male centerfold. “At the time, you know, men liked to look at women naked. Well, nobody talked about it, but women liked to look at men naked,” explained Editor Helen Gurley Brown inThe Improbable First Century of Cosmopolitan Magazine. “I did.”

Burt Reynolds, sexual pioneer? Kind of.

Read the rest of the article on Playboy.com

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